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"Superstitious"

"(Theme from) The Monkees" (Second Recorded Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocals: Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded in Mid 1966

"Tema Dei Monkees" (Italian Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart, with Nistri
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocals: Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded in Mid 1966
  • In another key than the English version.

"Kellogg's Jingle"

  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Recorded in Hollywood, Mid 1966
  • A commercial jingle sung by Micky with the instrumental backing track borrowing riffs from the theme song.

"All the King's Horses"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocals: Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Guitar: James Burton, Glen Campbell, and Al Casey
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Knechtel and Bob West
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman, and Jim Gordon
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 25 June, 1966 (7:30 PM – 12:15 AM)

"The Kind of Girl I Could Love"

  • Written by Roger Atkins and Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Guitar: James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Knetchtel, Bob West
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman, and Jim Gordon
  • Steel Guitar: Michael Nesmith [1]
  • Arrangement: Don Peake
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 25 June, 1966 (7:30 PM – 12:15 AM)

"I Don't Think You Know Me" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz (on the 1994 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith (on Missing Links)
  • Co-lead vocal by Micky Dolenz (on the 1994 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz (on Missing Links)
  • Harmony vocal: Michael Nesmith (on the 1994 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Backing vocal: Micky Dolenz (on Missing Links)
  • Backing vocal: Michael Nesmith (on the 1994 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Guitar: James Burton, Glen Campbell, and Al Casey
  • Drums: Hal Blaine and Jim Gordon
  • Organ: Larry Knechtel
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Mixed by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart (on the 1994 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 25 June, 1966 (7:30 PM – 12:15 AM)
  • Arranged by Don Peake
  • Two mixes were made of this song. The first featured Micky on lead vocals and was mixed by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart. Michael recorded his own vocals later that year.

"Let's Dance On"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork, Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, Wayne Erwin, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 5 July, 1966 (2:00 – 7:30 PM)[2]

"(Theme from) The Monkees" (Album Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, Wayne Erwin, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 5 and 19 July, 1966 (2:00 – 7:30 PM)
  • An earlier version of the song can be found on the 1994 reissue of The Monkees.

"This Just Doesn't Seem to Be My Day"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, Wayne Erwin, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Cello: Joseph Ditullio
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 5 July, 1966 (2:00 – 7:30 PM)[2]
  • Longer mix with an extended instrumental break featured in The Monkees episodes "Royal Flush" and "The Chaperone".

"Papa Gene's Blues"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, James Helms, and Don Peake
  • Bass Guitar: William Pitman
  • Drums: Hal Blaine, and Frank DeVito
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman, Jim Gordon (Vibraslap)
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at Western Recorders Studio 2, Hollywood, California, 7 July, 1966 (8:00 – 11:30 PM)
  • First album pressing features title incorrectly listed as "Papa Jean's Blues".

"I'll Be True to You (Yes I Will)"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Russ Titelman
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Glockenspiel: Bobby Hart
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, California, 9 July, 1966 (2:00 – 9:00 PM)
  • Mono mix features double-tracked vocals.
  • Originally titled "Yes I Will".
  • This is the only track from the original album not to be featured on the TV show.
  • Different version appears on Rhino/Flashback CD Last Train From Clarksville and Other Hits.

"Saturday's Child"

  • Written by David Gates
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, Wayne Erwin, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee and Louis Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Tambourine: Gene Estes
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 9 July, 1966 (2:00 - 9:00 PM)

"Take a Giant Step"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, and Unknown
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Electric Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Piano: Jack Keller
  • Harpsichord: Michael Rubini
  • Glockenspiel: Bobby Hart
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Oboe: Bob Cooper
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 9 July, 1966 (2:00 - 9:00 PM)

"I Won't Be the Same without Her"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: Michael Nesmith
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Bass Guitar: Bob West
  • Dano Bass: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman, and Frank DeVito
  • Piano: Larry Knechtel
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 18 July, 1966 (8:00 PM - 12:00 AM)

"Sweet Young Thing"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin, Carole King, and Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal: Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, Peter Tork, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Bass Guitar: Bob West
  • Dano Bass: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Drums: Hal Blaine, Frank DeVito, and Jim Gordon
  • Violin: Jimmy Bryant
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman
  • Piano: Larry Knechtel
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 18 July, 1966 (8:00 PM - 12:00 AM)

"You Just May Be the One" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Bass Guitar: Robert West
  • Dano Bass: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Drums: Hal Blaine, Jim Gordon
  • Percussion: Gene Estes, DeVito
  • Piano: Larry Knechtel
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 18 July, 1966 (8:00 PM - 12:00 AM)
  • Featured doubling of regular bass with Danelectro bass. The doubling of bass proved difficult to master as some 35 takes were needed before the backing track was completed.

"I Wanna Be Free" (Television Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz, and David Jones
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Tambourine: Gene Estes
  • Organ: Michael Rubini
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart

"I Wanna Be Free" (Album Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Acoustic Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Harpsichord: Michael Rubini
  • Violin: Bonnie Douglas and Paul Shure
  • Viola: Myra Kestenbuam
  • Cello: Fred Seykora
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 19 July, 1966 (2:00 – 7:30 PM)

"Gonna Buy Me a Dog"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz, and David Jones
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio #1, Hollywood, 23 July, 1966 (2:00 - 8:00 PM)

"Tomorrow's Gonna Be Another Day"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Steve Venet
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Electric Guitars: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Harmonica: Keith Allison
  • Tambourine: Unknown
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio #1, Hollywood, 23 July, 1966 (2:00 - 8:00 PM)

"I Can't Get Her off My Mind"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Unknown
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes and David Walters
  • Tack Piano: Bobby Hart
  • Auto Harp: Bobby Hart
  • Marimba: Gene Estes
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 25 July, 1966 (7:00 PM - 3:00 AM)
  • Later re-recorded by The Monkees and used on Headquarters.

"Last Train to Clarksville"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Unknown
  • Electric Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes and David Walters
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 25 July, 1966 (7:00 PM - 3:00 AM)
  • The song was originally released as a single, reaching #1 on the pop music charts.

"So Goes Love" (Second Recorded Version)

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: David Jones
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Jim Helms
  • Bass: Bill Pittman
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Electric Piano: Billy Preston
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman, and Jim Gordon
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded between 7 - 25 July 1966
  • Arranged by: Don Peake

"Mary, Mary"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Bass Guitar: Bob West
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Piano: Michael Cohen and Larry Knechtel
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman and Jim Gordon
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Arranged by: Don Peake
  • Recorded at Western Recorders, Hollywood, 25 July, 1966
  • The 1990 Arista CD version of the original album features the Extended Stereo Mix, the same that appears in the More Greatest Hits of the Monkees CD Version.
  • Despite being the songwriter and producer of the track, as well as being a member of the group, Michael Nesmith does not contribute vocally or musically to this track.

"Of You"

  • Written by Bill and John Chadwick
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Michael Deasy
  • Bass Guitar: Bob West
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman and Jim Gordon
  • Piano: Michael Cohen and Larry Knechtel
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at Western Recorders, Hollywood, 25 July, 1966
  • The stereo mix with harmony vocals from Micky Dolenz was featured on Missing Links. The mono mix without the harmony vocals was featured on the Monkees Music Box set.

"(I'm Not Your) Steppin' Stone"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Percussion: Henry Levy
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Arranged by: Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at Western Recorders, Studio #1, Hollywood, 26 July, 1966
  • Reached #20 on the pop charts, making it the first Monkees B-Side to chart
  • The original mono and stereo mixes differ slightly in two spots. On the stereo mix, Micky's vocal is dubbed in at the end of the instrumental bridge just before the second verse; this vocal bridge does not appear on the mono mix. During the fade, Micky's repeated, "Not your steppin' stone" begins sooner on the stereo mix than on the mono mix. The mono single fades out earlier than the track from the mono album, despite that both mixes are shown with a playing time of 2:25.

"(Theme from) The Monkees" (Television Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, CA, 6 August, 1966

"Valleri" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal: David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, Tommy Boyce, Wayne Erwin, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, California, 6 August, 1966

"She"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, Tommy Boyce, Wayne Erwin, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Norm Jefferies and Unknown
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 15 August, 1966
  • While Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart are officially credited as the writer's of the song, several sites and sources claim Angelo Badalamenti, Jeff Barry, and Marianne Faithfull to have co-written the track.[3] These hints are incorrect. Badalamenti and Faithfull did not begin collaborating until the mid 1990's,[4] when they wrote a completely different song called "She". Jeff Barry's work with the band on this and later albums is well-documented (including writing the song "She Hangs Out") and there is no reliable evidence or reason to believe he contributed to this track.

"Kicking Stones (Teeny Tiny Gnome)"

  • Written by Lynn Castle and Wayne Erwin
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Wayne Erwin, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Piano: Bobby Hart
  • Organ: Paul Suter
  • Trumpet: Steve Huffsteter
  • Trombone: Gilbert Falco and Dick Hyde
  • Horn: Bob Jung and Don McGinnis
  • Flute: Paul Suter
  • Vibes: Emil Richards
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio B, Hollywood, 23 August, 1966
  • Originally featured on Missing Links, titled "Teeny Tiny Gnome."
  • "Teeny Tiny Gnome" is mislabeled. The correct title is "Kicking Stones", which can be found on the More of the Monkees Special Deluxe Edition, released in 2006.

Ladies Aid Society

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, Wayne Erwin, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Emil Richards
  • Piano: Bobby Hart
  • Trumpet: Steve Huffsteter
  • Trombone: Gilbert Falco and Dick Hyde
  • Horn: Bob Jung and Don McGinnis
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio B, Hollywood, 23 August, 1966
  • The song, with its falsetto choruses was recorded during the sessions for More of the Monkees. It was an attempt to capture the same spirit of pastoral, suburban Britain that The Kinks did.

"Hold on Girl (Help is on its Way)" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Billy Carr, Jack Keller and Ben Raleigh
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Alan Estes
  • Oboe: Norman Benno
  • Harpsichord: Michel Rubini
  • Produced by Jeff Barry and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 10 September, 1966

"Hold on Girl (Help is on its Way)" (Album Version)

  • Written by Billy Carr, Jack Keller and Ben Raleigh
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry and Jack Keller
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 September, and American Studios, Studio City, 23 October, 1966
  • An earlier slower version of the song was released on "Missing Links Volume Two" in 1990.

"Mr. Webster" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Acoustic Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Harpsichord: Michel Rubini
  • Percussion: Alan Estes
  • Oboe: Norman Benno
  • Cello: Maggie Aue
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 September, 1966
  • Originally featured on Missing Links Volume Two

"Through the Looking Glass" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Red Baldwin, Tommy Boyce, and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Piano: Michel Rubini
  • Percussion: Alan Estes
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 September, 1966
  • This version of the song was recorded during the sessions for More of the Monkees. It was later re-cut for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees, and released on Instant Replay.

"Sometime in the Morning"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz and Carole King
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry, Gerry Goffin, and Carole King
  • Recorded at New York City, 13 and 25 October, 1966

"I Don't Think You Know Me" (Second Recorded Version)

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal: Peter Tork
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry, Gerry Goffin, and Carole King
  • Recorded at New York City, 13 October, 1966 (studio unknown)
  • Intended for use for the television series, but never broadcast.

"I'm a Believer" (Early Version - Take 4A)

  • Written by Neil Diamond
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Recorded in New York City, 15 and 23 October, 1966
  • Take 4A, which is slightly slower and features raw vocals from Micky.

"I'm a Believer" (Album Version)

  • Written by Neil Diamond
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni and Sal Ditroia
  • Acoustic Guitar: Neil Diamond
  • Bass Guitar: Dick Romoff
  • Drums: Buddy Salzman
  • Piano: Jeff Barry
  • Organ: Artie Butler
  • Tambourine: Jeff Barry
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Recorded in New York City, 15 and 23 October, 1966
  • Reached #1 on the pop charts, and becoming The Monkees' biggest hit.
  • An earlier version of the song can be found on the 1994 reissue of More of the Monkees.

"Look Out (Here Comes Tomorrow)"

  • Written by Neil Diamond
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Spoken vocal: Peter Tork (on the 2006 reissue of More of the Monkees)
  • Acoustic Guitar: Neil Diamond
  • Drums: Buddy Salzman
  • Organ: Maurgan Cheff
  • Percussion: Kauren Seguer
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Recorded in New York City, 15 and 23 October, 1966
  • Extended mixes of the song featuring an organ solo can be found on the 1994 and 2006 reissues of More of the Monkees. The mix found on the 2006 reissue of More of the Monkees features a narration by Peter Tork. This was intended to give Peter a bigger role in the album.

"Your Auntie Grizelda"

  • Written by Diane Hildebrand and Jack Keller
  • Lead vocal: Peter Tork
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry and Jack Keller
  • Engineered by: Richard Podolor
  • Recorded at American Studios, Studio City, 23 October, 1966

"Looking for Good Times"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Tambourine: Gene Estes
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 26 October, 1966
  • The song was considered to be used in the Monkees' TV show, but the idea was dropped.

"I'll Spend My Life with You" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: Ron Hicklin
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes and David Walters
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 26 October, 1966
  • Unused until Headquarters, when it was re-recorded by the Monkees.

"Tear Drop City"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • The song was sped up from the original recording, changing the key from G to A-flat, and mixed in stereo for Instant Replay in 1969. The original mono mix was released on the 2006 reissue of More of the Monkees.

"I'll Be Back up on My Feet" (First Recorded Version)

"Don't Listen to Linda" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Saxophone: Jim Seals
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 28 October, 1966
  • Intended for More of the Monkees, then put aside and re-cut for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees, but then again put aside later for the Instant Replay album.

"Apples, Peaches, Bananas and Pears"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Gene Estes
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 28 October, 1966

"I Never Thought It Peculiar"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Acoustic Guitar: Tommy Boyce
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Organ: Bobby Hart
  • Violin: Harold Ayres, John DeVoogdt, James Getzoff, Joy Lulu, and Norman Serkin
  • Viola: William Hymanson and Gareth Nuttycombe
  • Cello: Frederick Seykora
  • Saxophone: Jay Migliori
  • Trumpet: Chuck Findley
  • French Horn: Alan Robinson
  • Trombone: Dick Hyde
  • Bell: Gene Estes
  • Unknown: Michael Anthony
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Arranged by: Jimmie Haskell
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 28 October, 1966, and The Sound Factory, Hollywood, 12 September, 1969

"The Day We Fall in Love"

  • Written by Sandy Linzer and Denny Randell
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Guitar: Al Casey
  • Bass Guitar: Carol Kaye and Ray Pohlman
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Harpsichord and Organ: Don Randi and Michel Rubini
  • Percussion: Frank Capp and Julius Wechter
  • Violin: Louis Haber, Irving Spice, and Lousi Stone
  • Viola: David Sackson and Murray Sandry
  • Cello: Seymour Barab
  • Conductor: Arthur Butler
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios Hollywood, 28 October, 1966 and RCA Victor Studio B, New York City, 23 November, 1966

"Laugh"

  • Written by Phil Margo, Mitchell Margo, Hank Medress, and Jay Siegal
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, Jeff Barry, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Al Casey and Carol Kaye
  • Bass Guitar: Ray Pohlman
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Harpsichord and Organ: Don Randi and Michel Rubini
  • Percussion: Frank Capp and Julius Wechter
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 28 October, 1966

"Words" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, Tommy Boyce, Wayne Erwin, Bobby Hart, and Ron Hicklin
  • Guitar: Wayne Erwin, Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Larry Taylor
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Norm Jeffries
  • Flute: Ethmer Roten
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Recorded in October, 1966
  • Originally featured on Missing Links Volume Two.

"(I Prithee) Do Not Ask for Love" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Michael Martin Murphey
  • Lead vocal: Micky Dolenz (on Missing Links Volume Two)
  • Lead vocal: David Jones (on the 2006 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz (on the 2006 reissue of The Monkees)
  • Guitar: Peter Tork, James Burton, Glen Campbell, Al Casey, and Mike Deasey
  • Bass Guitar: Bob West
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman and Jim Gordon
  • Piano: Michael Cohen and Larry Knechtel
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded on 17 November, 1966
  • Two sessions for Micky's vocals were made. The second (which Micky believed was "terribly out of sync") came in October 1966 and was the basis for the song's 1990 release. A different vocal by Micky was recorded earlier that summer.

"When Love Comes Knockin' (At Your Door)"

  • Written by Carole Bayer Sager and Neil Sedaka
  • Double tracked lead vocal by David Jones
  • Guitar: Al Gafa, Willard Suyker, and Donald Thomas
  • Bass Guitar: Russell Savakus
  • Drums: Herbert Lovell
  • Piano: Neil Sedaka
  • Percussion: Unknown
  • Produced by Carole Bayer Sager and Neil Sedaka
  • Engineered by: Ernie Olerich
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 23 November, 1966

"She's So Far Out, She's In"

  • Written by Thomas Baker Knight
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: John London
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at Goldstar Studio A, Hollywood, 16 January, 1967 (10:00 AM - 6:00 PM)
  • A staple of the group's 1966-67 concert tour, this was the first official recording of the group with producer Chip Douglas. The group ran through several takes, but none came through to the satisfaction of Douglas. One full take (available on Headquarters Sessions) came through in which Michael's lead guitar changed volume seconds into the performance.

"The Girl I Knew Somewhere" (Second Recorded Version)

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Bass Guitar: John London
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Harpsichord: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at Goldstar Studios, Hollywood, 16 January (10:00 AM - 6:00 PM), and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 19, 23, and 24 January, 26 (8:00 - 11:00 PM), 28 (2:00 - 6:00 PM), 30 (10:00 - 12:00 AM), and 31 January (2:00 PM - 12:00 AM), and 2 February 1967 (8:00 - 10:00 PM)
  • First known recording for the Headquarters album.
  • Originally recorded with just electric guitar (played by Mike), acoustic guitar (Peter), drums (Micky), bass guitar (John London), and tambourine (Davy), a complex harpsichord piece was added when Peter accidentally played the harpsichord during a rehearsal and the note that came out blended with the song to the enthusiastic satisfaction of Mike.

"All of Your Toys"

  • Written by Bill Martin
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: John London
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Harpsichord: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at Goldstar Studios, Hollywood 16 January (10:00 AM - 6:00 PM), and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 19, 23, 24 January, and 26 (8:00 - 11:00 PM), 28 (2:00 - 6:00 PM), 30 (10:00 - 12:00 AM), 31 January (2:00 PM - 12:00 AM), and 2 February 1967 (8:00 - 10:00 PM)
  • Unused track that was the proposed A-side of the next Monkees single, but song was not controlled by the Monkees' publishing company, Screen Gems; publisher Tickson Music refused to sell the copyright.
  • The track is included on Missing Links in a stereo mix, as a bonus track on Headquarters in a slightly different mono mix, and the Listen to the Band and Music Box sets in a slightly different stereo mix. It is also included on Monkeemania (The Very Best of the Monkees) in the same stereo mix as the one on Missing Links.

"A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You"

  • Written by Neil Diamond
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Neil Diamond, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni, Don Thomas, and Hugh McCracken
  • Bass Guitar: Louis Mauro and James Tyrell
  • Drums: Herb Lovelle
  • Piano: Stan Free
  • Organ: Arthur Butler
  • Tambourine: Thomas Cerone
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 21 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 24 January, and 4 and 6 February, 1967
  • Reached #2 on the pop charts.
  • Both mono and stereo mixes of "A Little Bit Me, A Little Bit You" were made, the master recordings of the song disappeared after the 1960's, with later issues being made from dubs of the earlier mixes. The original stereo mix (with reverb added to the vocals, a longer fade, no handclaps, and David Jones singing "no, no" over the bridge) first appeared on The Monkees Greatest Hits album in 1969 and later on other collections, until the multi-track master was rediscovered by Rhino Records; a new stereo remix, more closely matching the mono mix, was issued as a bonus track on Rhino's two CD deluxe version of Headquarters in 2007.

"Love to Love"

  • Written by Neil Diamond
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork (on Good Times!)
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni, Don Thomas, and Hugh McCracken
  • Bass Guitar: Louis Mauro and James Tyrell
  • Drums: Herb Lovelle
  • Piano: Stan Free
  • Organ: Arthur Butler
  • Tambourine: Thomas Cerone
  • Produced by Jeff Barry (on Missing Links Volume Three)
  • Produced by Adam Schlesinger (on Good Times!)
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry (on Missing Links Volume Three)
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall (on Missing Links Volume Three)
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 21 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 24 January, and 4 and 5 February, 1967, and 5 August, 1969; and Lucy's Meat Market, Los Angeles, February 2016 (on Good Times!)
  • All versions of the song include a vocal that David Jones re-recorded in 1969.
    • A vocal track was recorded by David Jones for The Monkees Present, but left unreleased until 2016 when Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork contributed new backing vocals for Good Times!
  • Originally recorded in 1967 for the groups third album (which would become Headquarters), the vocal track was re-recorded by Jones for The Monkees Present, but left unreleased until 2016 when Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork contributed new backing vocals for Good Times! The original vocal track recorded in 1967 remains unreleased, though another vocal track recorded in 1969 was featured on most releases of the song.

"You Can't Tie a Mustang Down"

  • Written by Jeff Barry, Jerry Leiber, and Mike Stoller
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni, Don Thomas, and Hugh McCracken
  • Bass Guitar: Louis Mauro and James Tyrell
  • Drums: Herb Lovelle
  • Tambourine: Thomas Cerone
  • Piano: Stan Free
  • Organ: Arthur Butler
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 21 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 24 January, and 4 February, 1967

"Gotta Give It Time"

  • Written by Jeff Barry, Jerry Leiber, Joey Levine, and Mike Stoller [5]
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: Michael Nesmith
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni, Don Thomas, and Hugh McCracken
  • Bass Guitar: Louis Mauro
  • Drums: Herb Lovelle
  • Organ: Arthur Butler
  • Tambourine: Thomas Cerone
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Produced by Adam Schlesinger (on Good Times!)
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 21 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 24 January 1967, and Lucy's Meat Market, Los Angeles, February 2016
  • Leftover from the final Kirshner supervised sessions in January 1967, however no vocals were recorded at the time.

"99 Pounds"

  • Written by Jeff Barry
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Unknown
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni, Don Thomas, and Hugh McCracken
  • Bass Guitar: Louis Mauro and James Tyrell
  • Drums: Herb Lovelle
  • Piano: Stan Free
  • Organ: Arthur Butler
  • Tambourine: Thomas Cerone
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 21 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 24 January, and 4, 5 and 6 February, 1967
  • Recorded during the final Kirshner-supervised Monkees sessions for what would become known as Headquarters.

"She Hangs Out" (Single Version)

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocal: Unknown
  • Guitar: Al Gorgoni, Don Thomas, and Hugh McCracken
  • Bass Guitar: Louis Mauro and James Tyrell
  • Drums: Herb Lovelle
  • Piano: Stan Free
  • Organ: Arthur Butler
  • Tambourine: Thomas Cerone
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 21 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 24 January, and 4, 5 February, 1967
  • While Jeff Barry is officially credited as the writer of the song, several sites and sources claim Ellie Greenwich to have co-written the track. [6]
  • Later re-recorded and released on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited.

"I Wanna Be Your Puppy Dog"

  • Written by Sandy Linzer and Denny Randell
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Denny Randell
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B New York City, 22 (1:00 - 7:30 PM) and 27 January 1967 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM)

"Love is on the Way"

  • Written by Sandy Linzer and Denny Randell
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Denny Randell
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 22 (1:00 - 7:30 PM), 27 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 28 January 1967 (4:30 PM - 7:30 PM)

"I Didn't Know You Had It in You Sally (You're a Real Ball of Fire)"

  • Written by Sandy Linzer and Denny Randell
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Denny Randell
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Re-produced by Jeff Barry
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 22 (1:00 - 7:30 PM), and 28 January 1967 (4:30 PM - 7:30 PM) and 15 September 1969
  • The track includes a vocal that Micky recorded in 1969.

"Sugar Man"

  • Written by Sandy Linzer and Denny Randell
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Denny Randell
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 22 (1:00 - 7:30 PM), 27 (11:00 AM - 7:00 PM) and 28 January 1967 (4:30 PM - 7:30 PM)
  • Another song "Sugar, Sugar" which had been recorded by The Archies, is said to have been earlier offered to The Monkees, although songwriter Jeff Barry denies this. Don Kirshner has said that Michael Nesmith put his fist through the wall of the Beverly Hills Hotel refusing to do "Sugar, Sugar". However, Monkees archival expert Andrew Sandoval has suggested that the band may actually instead have been offered the song "Sugar Man", but with the passage of time the parties involved simply mis-remembered it as being "Sugar, Sugar", in large part because it made a better anecdote. Peter Tork claimed in an interview that the band were offered "Sugar, Sugar", despite Jeff Barry's denial of this. A link to the interview can be found here.

"Poor Little Me"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 26 January 1967 (11:00 AM - 6:30 PM)

"If I Learned to Play the Violin"

  • Written by Joey Levine and Artie Resnick
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 26 January (11:00 AM - 6:30 PM), and 4 and 6 February, 1967

"Black and Blue"

  • Written by Neil Diamond, Jerry Leiber, and Mike Stoller
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 26 January 1967 (11:00 AM - 6:30 PM)

"Eve of My Sorrow"

  • Written by Jeff Barry, Jerry Leiber, Joey Levine, and Mike Stoller
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 26 January 1967 (11:00 AM - 6:30 PM)

"The Love You Got Inside"

  • Written by Jeff Barry, Andy Kim, Jerry Leiber, and Mike Stoller
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Ray Hall
  • Recorded at RCA Studio B, New York City, 26 January 1967 (11:00 AM - 6:30 PM)

"The Girl I Knew Somewhere" (Single Version)

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: John London
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: John London
  • Harpsichord: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 23 February, 1967 (2:00 - 10:00 PM)
  • Reached #39 on the pop charts
  • The 1987 stereo mix of the song which is more commonly used today features additional backing vocals during the harpsichord solo, while the mono mix doesn't. The original 1967 stereo mix does not include the additional backing vocals, so it is otherwise more similar to the mono mix, only it's in stereo.

"Sunny Girlfriend"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: David Jones
  • Electric 6-String Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: John London
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Maracas: David Jones
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 23 February (2:00 - 10:00 PM) and Studio C, 18 April, 1967
  • Mike and Micky recorded the song's vocals on a separate track featuring Mike on guitar and Micky with shaker.

"Nine Times Blue" (Demo Version)

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, February, 1967
  • Later re-recorded during the sessions for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees and released on Missing Links.

"Mr. Webster" (Album Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: David Jones
  • Guitar: Micky Dolenz
  • Steel Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: John London
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 24 February, 1967 (1:00 - 7:30 PM)
  • A remake by the band; the earlier, slower version with session musicians was recorded during the sessions for More of the Monkees and is featured on Missing Links Volume Two.

"She'll Be There" (Acoustic Duet)

  • Written by Sharon Sheeley
  • Arranged by Micky Dolenz and Coco Dolenz
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: Coco Dolenz
  • Acoustic Guitar: Micky Dolenz
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, February, 1967
  • Micky and his sister Coco were responsible for the arrangement of the song "She'll Be There". However it was unknown exactly who wrote it at the time, and as a result no official writer's credit was given.

"Midnight Train" (Demo Version)

  • Written by Micky Dolenz
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: Coco Dolenz
  • Acoustic Guitar: Micky Dolenz
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, February, 1967
  • Later re-cut during the sessions for The Monkees Present and released on Changes
  • While Micky Dolenz is officially credited as the writer of the song, several sites and sources claim Chris McCarty, Kenny Lee Lewis and Steve Miller to have co-written the track.[7]
  • Originally released on Missing Links Volume Three.

"You Just May Be the One" (Album Version)

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 2 March, 1967, and 16 March (12:00 - 7:00 PM)
  • A remake by the band; the earlier version which featured session musicians was recorded during the sessions for the Monkees' debut album; this earlier version was used several times during Season One of the Monkees' television series. It was eventually released on Missing Links Volume Two.

"Band 6"

  • Written by Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Spoken words by Micky Dolenz and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Steel Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 2 March, 1967 (7:00 PM - 12:00 AM)
  • A studio exercise, based on the Looney Tunes theme.

"Randy Scouse Git (Alternate Title)"

  • Written by Micky Dolenz
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Timpani: Micky Dolenz
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio B, Hollywood, 2 March (7:00 PM - 12:00 AM), and Studio C, 4 (12:00 PM - 1:00 AM) and 8 March, 1967 (12:30 PM - 12:00 AM)

"You Told Me"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Banjo: Peter Tork
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Zither: Micky Dolenz
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 3 March (7:30 PM - 12:00 AM) and 9, 1967 (12:30 PM - 12:00 AM)
  • The opening parodies the Beatles' "Taxman," from their album Revolver. The two songs also have similar basslines, though this appears unintentional.

"Zilch"

  • Written by Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Peter Tork
  • Spoken words by Peter Tork, David Jones, Micky Dolenz, and Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 3 March, 1967 (7:30 PM - 12:00 AM)
  • A fugue made up of disparate phrases; the Monkees would sometimes enter public places performing it.
  • The Headquarters Sessions compilation features the four spoken tracks separately to reveal everything that was said.
  • In the stereo release of the composition, Peter and Micky can be heard through one speaker while Davy and Mike can be heard through the other.

"I'll Spend My Life with You" (Album Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: Peter Tork
  • Electric 6-String Guitar: Micky Dolenz
  • Acoustic 12-String Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Steel Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Celesta: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 4 (12:00 PM - 1:00 AM), 9 (12:30 PM - 1:00 AM), 10, 11 (12:00 PM - 12:00 AM) and 18 March, 1967 (12:30 PM - 2:30 AM)
  • A remake by the band; the earlier version was recorded during the sessions for More of the Monkees which featured session musicians.

"Forget That Girl"

  • Written by Douglas Farthing Hatlelid
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Unknown
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Maracas: David Jones
  • Electric Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 7 (12:30 PM - 2:00 AM) and 8 March, 1967 (12:30 PM - 12:00 AM)

"Jericho" (Studio Dialogue)

  • Traditional, arranged by Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork
  • Vocal by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • French Horn: David Jones
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 10 March, 1967 (12:00 PM - 12:00 AM)
  • This was recorded during a break from regular sessions when Davy starts fooling around with a French horn, Peter and Chip make fun of his playing. Micky soon cuts in with a shtick about "Jericho's Wall" after Douglas mentions it and amid the laughter, the conversation spirals into a spontaneous vocal jam by Peter and Micky of the song "Jericho".
  • A longer, unedited version appears on the Headquarters Sessions compilation.

"Peter Gunn's Gun" (Jam Session)

  • Written by Henry Mancini
  • Spoken words by Peter Tork, Micky Dolenz, and Michael Nesmith
  • Steel Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 11 March, 1967 (12:00 PM - 12:00 AM)
  • This was one of numerous studio jams the boys concocted during recording.

"Pillow Time" (Studio Dialogue)

  • Written by Janelle Scott (Micky's mother) and Matt Willis
  • Spoken words by Micky Dolenz and Hank Cicalo
  • Zither: Micky Dolenz
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 14 March, 1967 (12:00 PM - ?)
  • This was recorded when Micky was helping engineer Hank Cicalo with studio echo effects. Micky also plays on a zither that can be heard on the opening of the original album.
  • A longer, unedited version of this session is featured on the Headquarters Sessions compilation.
  • Later recorded and released on The Monkees Present.

"Shades of Gray"

  • Written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil
  • Lead vocals by David Jones and Peter Tork
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Steel Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Jerry Yester
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Maracas: David Jones
  • Cello: Frederick Seykora
  • French Horn: Vincent DeRosa
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 16 (12:00 - 7:00 PM) and 22 March, 1967
  • Some compilations credit songwriting to Gerry Goffin and Carole King, and production to Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart, and Jack Keller.

"I Can't Get Her off My Mind" (Album Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Jerry Yester
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Tack Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 17 (12:30 - 7:00 PM) and 19 March, 1967 (2:00 - 11:00 PM)
  • A remake by the band; the earlier version was recorded in July 1966 during the sessions for the debut album featuring session musicians. It was released as a bonus track on the 1994 reissue of the Monkees' debut album.

"No Time"

  • Written by Micky Dolenz and Michael Nesmith, with David Jones and Peter Tork
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, and Unknown
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith, and Unknown
  • Bass Guitar: Chip Douglas
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 17 (12:30 - 7:00 PM) and 22 March, 1967
  • The song was written by the four Monkees (according to Peter, composition was done primarily by Micky and Mike), but as a reward for his hard work on the album, the band decided to credit the song to recording engineer Hank Cicalo, guaranteeing him a large royalty check. The released version of the song was the second version recorded for the album; the first included session help from guitarists Keith Allison and Jerry Yester, but the released version has only Douglas assisting the quartet.
  • The chords of the song are fairly similar to those of The Beatles' cover of The Shirelles' song "Boys".
  • Micky's "Rock on, George, for Ringo one time" refers to The Beatles' cover of wikipedia:Carl Perkins' song "Honey Don't."

"Early Morning Blues and Greens"

  • Written by Diane Hildebrand and Jack Keller
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocal: Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Percussion: Unknown
  • Maracas: David Jones
  • Electric Piano: Peter Tork
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 18 March (12:30 PM - 2:30 AM), and 22, 1967

"For Pete's Sake"

  • Written by Joseph Richards and Peter Tork
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Peter Tork
  • Electric Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Electric 12-String Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio C, Hollywood, 23 and 24 March, 1967 (1:00 PM - 2:30 AM)
  • An edited mix of the song became the closing theme for the show's second season.

"Cuddly Toy"

  • Written by Harry Nilsson
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocals: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Acoustic Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Electric Piano: Peter Tork
  • Cello: Edgar Lustgarten
  • Horns: Ted Nash, Tom Scott, and Bud Shank
  • Wind: Ted Nash, Tom Scott, and Bud Shank
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 26 April, 1967
  • The copy presented on the album does not have a fade, while appearances on compilation albums do.
  • Selected by the band after Nilsson auditioned several songs for the group.
  • Some have interpreted the lyrics as being about a gang bang. In the liner notes to the CD's 1995 release it is stated that producer Lester Sill was angered to discover this.

"The Door into Summer"

  • Written by Bill Martin, with Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocals: Micky Dolenz
  • Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz and Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Keyboards: Peter Tork
  • Banjo: Douglas Dillard
  • Unknown: Bill Martin and Harry Nilsson
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 29 May, and 23 August, 1967
  • The title is from a novel by sci-fi author Robert Heinlein.
  • Michael Nesmith was the only member of The Monkees to not contribute to the track instrumentally.
  • Eddie Hoh is credited with drumming, but some evidence exists that the first take featured Micky on drums. Close listening to the finished recording reveals that there are two separate drum tracks. The right channel features a restrained drummer (Micky Dolenz) which continues through the entire track. At the start of the second verse, another less-restrained drummer (Eddie Hoh) begins in the left channel and continues through the rest of the song.
  • Used in the episodes "Monkees on the Wheel" and "Some Like It Lukewarm".
  • The song was officially written by Bill Martin and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, though the latter denies any writing contribution.
  • The alternate mono mix released as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. features a different background vocal arrangement with a more prominent vocal by Micky, and an altered lead vocal by Mike. The drumming is also more restrained in that mix.

"Pleasant Valley Sunday"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, and Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Bill Chadwick
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 and 11 June, 1967 after their Hollywood Bowl performance.
  • The song was originally released as a single, reaching #3 on the pop music charts.
  • Micky Dolenz was the only member of The Monkees to not contribute to the track instrumentally.
  • The stereo album mix differs from the mix released as a single, also heard on the mono album.
  • The stereo and mono mixes feature slightly different vocals by Micky on the opening verse.
  • The fade on both released mixes is deliberately drowned in reverb and noise, but a karaoke mix released in 2004 features a conventional fade.

"Peter Percival Patterson's Pet Pig Porky"

  • Arranged by Peter Tork
  • Spoken words by Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 June, 1967
  • Taught to Peter by Judy Mayhan, whom he was managing at the time.
  • Peter admits that it was public domain, but when Screen Gems asked who wrote it he gave his name (which he could do, as the 'arranger' of the piece).

"Salesman"

  • Written by Craig Vincent Smith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Spoken vocal: Michael Nesmith (on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited)
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Nylon-String Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Shaker: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 14 June, 1967
  • Craig Vincent Smith was a friend of Nesmith's who later appeared in the band Penny Arkade, which Nesmith produced.
  • Featured on the TV show in the episode "The Devil and Peter Tork" and caused controversy when NBC objected to the episode, citing the song and its veiled drug reference in the third verse. The song refers to the adventure of a travelling salesman.
  • An alternate mono mix of the song which features a goofy sales pitch by Nesmith over the fade, was released as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited.

"Words" (Album Version)

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Michael Nesmith
  • Chimes: David Jones
  • Tree: David Jones
  • (Hammond B-3) Organ: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 14 June, 1967
  • The song was originally released as a single, reaching #11 on the pop music charts.
  • Originally recorded for More of the Monkees in August 1966, but re-recorded for Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited under the group's direction. The original version was eventually released on Missing Links Volume Two.
  • In the music video, Peter plays the guitar, Michael plays the bass, Davy plays the drums and Micky sings and plays the tambourine. They said that this is what The Monkees lineup should have been.
  • The single mix is different from the - album - mix. Micky says "ah" twice in the single mix.

"Daydream Believer"

  • Written by John Stewart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, and Unknown
  • Bell: Bill Martin
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Keyboard: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Violin: Nathan Kaproff, George Kast, Alex Murray, and Erno Neufeld
  • Trumpet: Pete Candoli, Al Porcino, and Manuel Stevens
  • Piccolo Trumpet: Manuel Stevens
  • Trombone: Richard Noel
  • Bass Trombone: Richard Leith, and Philip Teele
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arranged by: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 14 June, and RCA Victor's "Nashville Sound" Studio, Nashville, TN, 9 August, 1967
  • The song was originally released as a single, replacing "Love is only Sleeping" (which was originally going to be the Monkees' next single) reaching #1 on the pop music charts.
  • The 1986 stereo mix is 9 seconds longer than the 1967 stereo album master.

"Daily Nightly"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Moog Synthesizer: Micky Dolenz (on the mix presented on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, and Jones Ltd.)
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 19 June, and August 1967 (on the mix presented on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, and Jones Ltd.)
  • The early mix released as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of 'Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, and Jones Ltd. lacks Dolenz's synthesizer part.
  • Nesmith's inspiration for this song stemmed from the infamous Sunset Strip riots and the misinformation that the media reported about the event; the event was first discussed by the boys in the epilogue interview segment of the episode "Find The Monkees".
  • The mono and stereo mixes have slightly different Moog parts.
  • Used in the episodes "Fairy Tale" and "The Monkees Blow Their Minds".

"Love is only Sleeping"

  • Written by Barry Mann and Cynthia Weil
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Harmony vocals: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Sound Effects: Bill Chadwick
  • Unknown: Bill Martin and Harry Nilsson
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 19 June, and August 1967 (on the mix presented on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn, and Jones Ltd.)
  • Not originally intended to be included on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. as the song was to be issued as a single instead.
  • After a manufacturing error caused some delays, Colgems rethought the strategy and released the more commercial "Daydream Believer" as the single instead, with "Goin' Down" as its B-side
  • The song was featured on three episodes of the TV show—"Everywhere a Sheik, Sheik", "I Was A 99-pound Weakling", and "The Monkees In Paris." The Paris episode feature's the song's released mix while the first two episodes feature a more stripped-down version derived from the song's original four-track mix before it was transferred to eight-track magnetic tape for additional mixing. This song was the first song by Nesmith after his surgery in 1967.
  • The original four-track mix released as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Ltd. lacks the released mix's extensive echo effects and also features alternate organ parts, particularly on the ending.

"What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?"

  • Written by Owens "Boomer" Castleman, and Michael Martin Murphey
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Banjo: Douglas Dillard
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 20 June, 1967
  • Chosen by Michael Nesmith for the country feel it gave off; Murphey was an old friend of Nesmith's.
  • The released mix features group vocals, but an early mix featured only a double-tracked vocal by Nesmith.
  • Used in the episodes "It's a Nice Place To Visit...", "Monkees Marooned", and "The Monkees Race Again". The mix included in "Monkees Marooned" had a slightly longer run time, owing to the song's chorus being repeated four times after the last verse, instead of three times.

"Don't Call on Me"

  • Written by John London and Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Spoken words: Micky Dolenz and David Jones
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Claves: Eddie Hoh
  • Piano: Robert Rafelson
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 20 June and 9 October, 1967, and RCA Victor Nashville Sound Studio, Nashville, August 1967
  • A reworked version of a pre-Monkees Nesmith song.
  • Recorded during two Hollywood sessions, not from "the elegant Pump Room of the magnificent Palmer House, high over Chicago", which could not be possible anyway. The Pump Room Restaurant and Palmer House Hotel are two separate businesses located in two different areas of Chicago. The song begins with the sounds of a live audience in a lounge with dialogue between the boys, working into a jazzy, slow tune.
  • Show producer Robert Rafelson played piano heard in the song's intro.
  • Used in the episode "The Monkees in Paris".

"Goin' Down"

  • Written by Diane Hilderbrand, with Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Trumpet: Bud Brisbois, Virgil Evans, Uan Rasey, and Thomas Scott
  • Trombone: Louis Blackburn, Richard Leith, Richard Nash, and Philip Teelee
  • Saxophone: William Collette, William Hood, Plas Johnson, and John Lowe
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arranged by: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 20 June, 5 July, and 5 September 1967
  • Intended to be on the album, but cut after including "Love Is Only Sleeping" on the album.
  • Inspired by Mose Allison and his song "Parchman Farm." It began as a free-form jam and then Michael decided it should be recorded as an original track.
  • The extended mono mix does not have a genuine fade-out, while appearances on compilations, and the 07' release do.
  • On the mono mix, the jazzy riff is more restrained and muffled, the background hiss is more restrained, and the trumpet wailing is less restrained. The tempo is also slightly faster than on the single. This can be proven by playing both mixes together starting at the exact same time.

"Star Collector"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocals: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, and Unknown
  • Spoken words: Micky Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Moog Synthesizer: Paul Beaver
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 22 June, 1967 and American Recorder, Studio City, 4 October 1967
  • Second song by The Monkees to feature a Moog Synthesizer. The first was "Daily Nightly".
  • The song was about the growing phenomenon of groupies
  • An alternate mix without Paul Beaver's Moog riffing was used on the TV show in the biker-themed episode "The Wild Monkees". A different version of this Moog-less mix is featured on Rhino Records' 2007 two-disc re-release of the album.
  • Used in the episodes "The Wild Monkees", "Hitting the High Seas", "Monkees Watch Their Feet", "The Monkees in Paris", and "Monkees Mind Their Manor".
  • The song features Micky Dolenz singing "bye bye" during the moog riff after the final verse, and again during the end.
  • Peter Tork didn't think much of Beaver's performance, and told Rhino Records later "He played it like it was a flute or something," preferring Micky Dolenz's more random use of the Moog on "Daily Nightly" (which also appeared on Pisces) to produce spacey sounds.
  • An extended stereo mix, featuring a longer moog solo and an altered beginning and ending, was included as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited.

"She Hangs Out" (Album Version)

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith, and Unknown
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Percussion: Unknown
  • Trumpet: Pete Candoli, Robert Helfer, Al Porcino, and Manuel Stevens
  • Bass Trombone: Richard Leith, and Philip Teele
  • Trombone: Richard Noel
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arranged by: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio B, New York City, 21 July, 1967
  • Used on episode #41 ("The Card Carrying Red Shoes"), without the horns (the hornless master remains lost, but available on Remastered, Deluxe Edition - "Alternate Stereo Mix")
  • This was a remake of the January 1967 cut that Don Kirshner released without authorisation in Canada; the release helped lead to Kirshner's firing from Colgems Records.
  • The original mono mix features a longer fade than on the stereo mix.
  • Used in the episodes "Card Carrying Red Shoes" and "Some Like It Lukewarm"
  • While Jeff Barry is officially credited as the writer of the song, several sites and sources claim Ellie Greenwich to have co-written the track. [8]

"Ríu, Ríu Chíu" (Studio Version)

  • Traditional
  • Lead vocals by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, with Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded on 21 August, 1967
  • The song was recorded during the sessions for "Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Ltd". It was a traditional Spanish Christmas carol chosen by Producer Douglas who had performed it with the Modern Folk Quartet. This version features Douglas filling in for Davy Jones on lead vocals, along with Dolenz, Nesmith and Tork. The Monkees also performed it on their Christmas 1967 TV episode.

"Hard to Believe"

  • Written by Eddie Brick, Kim Capli, David Jones, and Charlie Rockett
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Guitar: Kim Capli
  • Bass Guitar: Kim Capli
  • Drums: Kim Capli
  • Percussion: Kim Capli
  • Piano: Kim Capli
  • Violin: Leonard Atkins, Arnold Belnick, Nathan Kaproff, Wilbert Nuttycombe, Jerome Reisler, and Darrel Terwilliger
  • Flugelhorn: Oliver Mitchell, Anthony Terran
  • French Horn: Vincent DeRosa
  • Baritone Saxophone: Jim Horn
  • Bass Trombone: Robert Knight
  • Shaker: Kim Capli
  • Claves: Kim Capli
  • Cowbell: Kim Capli
  • Orchestrated by: George Tipton
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arranged by: Roger Farris
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 23 August, 1967
  • This was the last new composition to be recorded that would make the album. It is also the only track to feature a single Monkee, and the only track that only features session musicians on instruments.
  • This the only song from the original album not to be used on the TV show.

"Special Announcement"

  • Spoken words by Peter Tork
  • Sound effects: Steve Pitts and Robert Rafelson
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, 9 October, 1967
  • Originally intended to be the kick-off to the album, it is a parody of the tape-alignment instructions for RCA Studios.
  • The track features a dog barking at the end.

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"The Girl I Left Behind Me" (Second Recorded Version)

"Tapioca Tundra"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Unknown
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Michael Nesmith, and Unknown
  • Whistling: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 11, 18, and 19 November, 1967
  • Lyrics are from a poem Nesmith wrote prior to composing the music.

"Carlisle Wheeling" (First Recorded Version)

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Banjo: Peter Tork
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Michael Nesmith
  • Percussion: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 18 and 19 November, 1967
  • First known recording, a second version was made available as a bonus track on Instant Replay, later be included on the Music Box.

"Nine Times Blue"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Pedal Steel Guitar: Orville "Red" Rhodes
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 18 and 19 November, 1967, and 2 February, and 5 April, 1968
  • Originally demoed during Headquarters sessions, the demo version was released as bonus track on Headquarters.

"Magnolia Simms"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Max Bennett
  • Drums: Earl Palmer
  • Tack Piano: Paul T. Smith
  • Trumpet: Oliver Mitchell
  • Trombone: Lew McCreary
  • Woodwinds: Jim Horn and Jack Nimitz
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 2 December, 1967
  • Recorded as a low-fi song with deliberate surface noise and skipping as if it came from a 78 RPM record. On the stereo mix, this track is heard only on the left channel.
  • Several sources claim Charles Rockett to have co-written the track.[9]

"Writing Wrongs"

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Richard Dey
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Michael Nesmith
  • Piano: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, California, 3 December, 1967
  • Final product is two takes spliced together.

This section is in need of additional information. You can help C.Syde's Wiki by expanding this section.

This section is in need of additional information. You can help C.Syde's Wiki by expanding this section.

This section is in need of additional information. You can help C.Syde's Wiki by expanding this section.

"I Love You Better"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 5 February, 1970
  • Issued as Colgems Records 45 RPM single #5011, April, 1970, #98

"Oh, My, My"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 5 February, 1970
  • Issued as Colgems Records 45 RPM single #5011, April, 1970, #98

"Tell Me Love"

  • Written by Jeff Barry
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 5 February, 1970

"Ticket on a Ferry Ride"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Bobby Bloom
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 25 March, 1970

"You're So Good to Me"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Bobby Bloom
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 25 March, 1970
  • While Jeff Barry and Bobby Bloom are officially credited as the writers of the song, several sites and sources claim that Robert Stone co-wrote it.[10] It is possible that You're So Good to Me was adapted from the 1969 song You're So Good which was recorded during the sessions for The Monkees Present, and released on Missing Links Volume Three.

"All Alone in the Dark"

  • Written by Ned Albright and Steven Soles
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: David Jones
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by: Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 26 March, 1970

"Do You Feel It Too?"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Andy Kim
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 26 March, 1970

"Acapulco Sun"

  • Written by Ned Albright and Steven Soles
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 2 April, 1970

"It's Got to Be Love"

  • Written by Neil Goldberg
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Engineered by Mike Moran
  • Recorded in New York City, 2 April, 1970

"Do It in the Name of Love"

  • Written by Bobby Bloom and Neil Goldberg
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz and David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Unknown
  • Drums: Unknown
  • Piano: Unknown
  • Keyboard: Unknown
  • Tambourine: Unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Recorded in New York City, 22 September, 1970
  • Issued as Bell Records 45 RPM single #986, April, 1971

"Lady Jane"

  • Written by Bobby Bloom and Neil Goldberg
  • Lead vocals by David Jones and Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Unknown
  • Acoustic Guitar: Unknown
  • Drums: Unknown
  • Piano: Unknown
  • Keyboard: Unknown
  • Tambourine: Unknown
  • Produced by Jeff Barry
  • Arranged by: Jeff Barry
  • Recorded in New York City, 22 September, 1970
  • Issued as Bell Records 45 RPM single #986, April, 1971

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References

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