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Note:
I do not own The Monkees' songs. They are owned by Colgems and Rhino Records, and Screen Gems. I'm just a fan of their music, and I made this compilation.

The Essential Monkees is a Monkees Greatest Hits compilation album compiled by C.Syde65. It was burnt in late 2011 - early 2012. It is not an official Monkees album and thus can not be bought.

This 2-disc compilation album includes 54 of The Monkees' finest hits and rarities - 27 songs on each disc. The featured songs were all my favourite Monkees tracks at the time of its compile date.

It includes every song that was featured on The Monkees' "25th Anniversary Collection" and the first disc of "The Definitive Monkees". Some of the songs from the Monkees' "Original Album Series", and the second disc of "The Definitive Monkees" are also featured.

The "normalise all audio files" box was ticked during the burning process of the CDs, so that all the sound tracks would be set to a standard volume. This was very useful to help the song copies re-mastered in 1992 blend in better with the louder and clearer song copies re-mastered in the 2000s.

The "no pause between tracks" box was also ticked, to prevent the Nero Express Essentials software from adding 2 second pauses between tracks, to free up more space on the CD - not that there wasn't enough space to fit 27 songs on the CD anyway.

Here is the track listing for the second of the two discs. The track listing for the first disc can be found on this page.

Disc Two - Track listing

  1. "Cuddly Toy" (Harry Nilsson) – 2:39
  2. "Pleasant Valley Sunday" (Gerry Goffin, Carole King) – 3:15
  3. "Peter Percival Patterson's Pet Pig Porky" (Peter Tork) - 0:27
  4. "Salesman" (Craig Vincent Smith) - 2:38
  5. "Words" [Album Version] (Tommy Boyce, Bobby Hart) - 2:52
  6. "Daydream Believer" (John Stewart) – 3:09
  7. "What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?" (Owens "Boomer" Castleman, Michael Martin Murphey) - 3:09
  8. "Goin' Down" [1967 Extended Mono Mix] (Diane Hilderbrand, Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith, Tork) - 4:40
  9. "Star Collector" (Goffin, King) - 4:28
  10. "She Hangs Out" [Album Version] (Jeff Barry) - 2:58
  11. "Ríu, Ríu Chíu" [Studio Version + 1989 Stereo Mix] (Traditional) - 1:34
  12. "I'll Be Back up on My Feet" [Album Version] (Sandy Linzer, Denny Randell) - 2:27
  13. "We Were Made for Each Other" (Carole Bayer Sager, George Fischoff) - 2:25
  14. "Merry Go Round" [1968 Mono Mix] (Hilderbrand, Tork) - 1:44
  15. "P.O. Box 9847" (Boyce, Hart) - 3:15
  16. "Valleri" [Album Version] (Boyce, Hart) – 2:20
  17. "Auntie's Municipal Court" (Keith Allison, Nesmith) - 4:05
  18. "Dream World" (Jones, Steve Pitts) - 3:22
  19. "The Poster" (Jones, Pitts) - 2:22
  20. "Shake 'Em Up" (and Let 'Em Roll) [1996 Stereo Mix] (Jerry Leiber, Mike Stoller) - 2:11
  21. "Porpoise Song (Theme from "Head")" (Goffin, King) - 4:13
  22. "Rosemarie" [1987 Stereo Mix] (Dolenz) - 2:30
  23. "Listen to the Band" (Nesmith) - 2:46
  24. "Steam Engine" [1969 Mono + Television Soundtrack Mix] (Douglas Farthing Hatlelid) - 2:25
  25. "Midnight Train" (Dolenz) - 2:08
  26. "That Was Then, This Is Now" (Vance Brescia) - 4:02
  27. "Heart and Soul" (Simon Byrne, Andrew Howell) - 3:44

Disc Two - Session Information

"Cuddly Toy"

  • Written by Harry Nilsson
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocals: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Peter Tork, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Acoustic Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Micky Dolenz
  • Tambourine: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Electric Piano: Peter Tork
  • Cello: Edgar Lustgarten
  • Horns: Ted Nash, Tom Scott, and Bud Shank
  • Wind: Ted Nash, Tom Scott, and Bud Shank
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 26 April, 1967
  • Released: 6th November 1967
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:02:39
  • Genre: Pop Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • The copy presented here does not have a fade, while appearances on compilation albums do.
  • This song and "The Door Into Summer" are the only songs on Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited that feature Micky on drums. For the last two years, I've said to myself - the band lineup should have been Peter Tork on lead guitar, Micky Dolenz on rhythm guitar, Michael Nesmith on bass guitar and David Jones on drums - at least for the albums, Michael Nesmith could still have been on lead guitar, Peter Tork on bass guitar, Micky Dolenz on drums, David Jones on percussion, for the TV series, right? Micky Dolenz did in-fact say that he was the rhythm guitarist in a band called "Micky and the One Nighters" before becoming a Monkee.
  • Demo was under the name "By Any Boy"
  • Selected by the band after Nilsson auditioned several songs for the group
  • Some have interpreted the lyrics as being about a gang bang. In the liner notes to the CD's 1995 release it is stated that producer Lester Sill was angered to discover this.
  • Last song on the compilation to feature Micky Dolenz on drums.

"Pleasant Valley Sunday"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, and Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Bill Chadwick
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 and 11 June, 1967 after their Hollywood Bowl performance.
  • Released: 10th July and 6th November 1967
  • Original Single: Pleasant Valley Sunday (A-Side)
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:03:15
  • Genre: Psychedelic Pop
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • The song was originally released as a single, reaching #3 on the pop music charts
  • Micky Dolenz was the only member of The Monkees to not contribute to this track instrumentally
  • The stereo album mix differs from the mix released as a single, also heard on the mono album.
  • The stereo and mono mixes feature slightly different vocals by Micky on the opening verse.
  • The fade on both released mixes is deliberately drowned in reverb and noise, but a karaoke mix released in 2004 features a conventional fade.

"Peter Percival Patterson's Pet Pig Porky"

  • Arranged by Peter Tork
  • Spoken words by Peter Tork
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 10 June, 1967
  • Released: 6th November 1967
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:00:27
  • Genre: Public Domain
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Taught to Peter by Judy Mayhan, whom he was managing at the time.
  • Peter admits that it was public domain, but when Screen Gems asked who wrote it he gave his name (which he could do, as the 'arranger' of the piece)

"Salesman"

  • Written by Craig Vincent Smith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Acoustic Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Nylon-String Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Shaker: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 14 June, 1967
  • Released: 6th November 1967
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:02:38
  • Genre: Country Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Craig Vincent Smith was a friend of Nesmith's who later appeared in the band Penny Arkade, which Nesmith produced.
  • Featured on the TV show in the episode "The Devil and Peter Tork" and caused controversy when NBC objected to the episode, citing the song and its veiled drug reference in the third verse. The song refers to the adventure of a travelling salesman.
  • An alternate mono mix of the song which features a goofy sales pitch by Nesmith over the fade, was released as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited.

"Words"

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocals by Micky Dolenz, and Peter Tork
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, Michael Nesmith, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Michael Nesmith
  • Chimes: David Jones
  • Tree: David Jones
  • (Hammond B-3) Organ: Peter Tork
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 14 June, 1967
  • Released: 10th July and 6th November 1967
  • Original Single: Pleasant Valley Sunday (A-Side)
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:02:52
  • Genre: Psychedelic Pop
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • The song was originally released as a single, reaching #11 on the pop music charts
  • Originally recorded for More of the Monkees in August 1966, but re-recorded for Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited under the group's direction. The original version was eventually released on Missing Links Volume Two.
  • In the music video, Peter plays the guitar, Michael plays the bass, Davy plays the drums and Micky sings and plays the tambourine. They said that this is what The Monkees lineup should have been.
  • The single mix is different from the - album - mix presented here. Micky says "ah" twice in the single mix.

Daydream Believer

  • Written by John Stewart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocal: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, and Unknown
  • Bell: Bill Martin
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Keyboard: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Violin: Nathan Kaproff, George Kast, Alex Murray, and Erno Neufeld
  • Trumpet: Pete Candoli, Al Porcino, and Manuel Stevens
  • Piccolo Trumpet: Manuel Stevens
  • Trombone: Richard Noel
  • Bass Trombone: Richard Leith, and Philip Teele
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio A, Hollywood, 14 June, and RCA Victor's "Nashville Sound" Studio, Nashville, TN, 9 August, 1967
  • Released: 25th October 1967 and 22nd April 1968
  • Original Single: Daydream Believer (A-Side)
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:03:09
  • Genre: Baroque Pop
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1986 Stereo Mix
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: 25th Anniversary Collection
  • The song was originally released as a single, replacing Love is only Sleeping (which was originally going to be the Monkees' next single) reaching #1 on the pop music charts.
  • The copy of the song presented here is the 1986 stereo mix which is 9 seconds longer than the 1967 stereo album master. The 1986 stereo mix was the one I grew up with, so I always knew that I'd be using this copy of "Daydream Believer" instead of using the 1967 stereo album master.

"What Am I Doing Hangin' 'Round?"

  • Written by Owens "Boomer" Castleman, and Michael Martin Murphey
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Banjo: Douglas Dillard
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 20 June, 1967
  • Released: 6th November 1967
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:03:09
  • Genre: Country Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Chosen by Michael Nesmith for the country feel it gave off; Murphey was an old friend of Nesmith's.
  • The released mix features group vocals, but an early mix featured only a double-tracked vocal by Nesmith.
  • Used in the episodes "It's a Nice Place To Visit...", "Monkees Marooned", and "The Monkees Race Again". The mix included in "Monkees Marooned" had a slightly longer run time, owing to the song's chorus being repeated four times after the last verse, instead of three times.

"Goin' Down"

  • Written by Diane Hilderbrand, with Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: David Jones
  • Trumpet: Bud Brisbois, Virgil Evans, Uan Rasey, and Thomas Scott
  • Trombone: Louis Blackburn, Richard Leith, Richard Nash, and Philip Teelee
  • Saxophone: William Collette, William Hood, Plas Johnson, and John Lowe
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 20 June, 5 July and 5 September 1967
  • Released: 25th October 1967
  • Original Single: Daydream Believer (B-Side)
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:04:40
  • Genre: Jazz-Blues
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Single Version + 1967 Extended Mono Mix
  • Channels: Mono
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Intended to be on the album, but cut after including "Love Is Only Sleeping" on the album.
  • Inspired by Mose Allison and his song "Parchman Farm." It began as a free-form jam and then Michael decided it should be recorded as an original track.
  • The extended mix presented here does not have a genuine fade-out, while appearances on compilations, and the 07' release do.
  • The mix presented here is in mono, the jazzy riff is more restrained and muffled, the background hiss is more restrained, the trumpet wailing is less restrained.
  • The tempo in this mix is slightly faster than in the single. This can be proven by playing both mixes together starting at the exact same time.
  • When I discovered this extended mono mix (which is roughly 23 seconds longer than the single mix) I decided to include it on my compilation. I used Adobe Audition to remove the 6 seconds of studio dialogue chatter at the end of the mix before burning it onto CD, to make it appear more like the mix presented as a single.

"Star Collector"

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Harmony vocals: Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, and Unknown
  • Spoken words: Micky Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Moog Synthesizer: Paul Beaver
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 22 June, 1967 and American Recorder, Studio City, 4 October 1967
  • Released: 6th November 1967
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:04:28
  • Genre: Experimental Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Second song by The Monkees to feature a Moog Synthesizer. The first was "Daily Nightly".
  • The song was about the growing phenomenon of groupies
  • An alternate mix without Paul Beaver's Moog riffing was used on the TV show in the biker-themed episode "The Wild Monkees." A different version of this Moog-less mix is featured on Rhino Records' 2007 two-disc re-release of the album.
  • Used in the episodes "The Wild Monkees", "Hitting the High Seas", "Monkees Watch Their Feet", "The Monkees in Paris", and "Monkees Mind Their Manor".
  • The song features Micky Dolenz singing "bye bye" during the moog riff after the final verse, and again during the end.
  • Peter Tork didn't think much of Beaver's performance, and told Rhino Records later "He played it like it was a flute or something," preferring Micky Dolenz's more random use of the Moog on "Daily Nightly" (which also appeared on Pisces) to produce spacey sounds.
  • An extended stereo mix, featuring a longer moog solo and an altered beginning and ending, was included as a bonus track on the 1995 reissue of Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited.

"She Hangs Out"

  • Written by Jeff Barry and Ellie Greenwich
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, David Jones, and Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith, and Unknown
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Percussion: Unknown
  • Trumpet: Pete Candoli, Robert Helfer, Al Porcino, and Manuel Stevens
  • Bass Trombone: Richard Leith, and Philip Teele
  • Trombone: Richard Noel
  • Produced by: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studio B, New York City, 21 July, 1967
  • Released: 6th November 1967
  • Original Album: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:02:58
  • Genre: Doo-Wop, Jazz Music, Pop Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1967 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Used on episode #41 ("The Card Carrying Red Shoes"), without the horns (the hornless master remains lost, but available on Remastered, Deluxe Edition - "Alternate Stereo Mix")
  • This was a remake of the January 1967 cut that Don Kirshner released without authorization in Canada; the release helped lead to Kirshner's firing from Colgems Records.
  • The original mono mix features a longer fade than on the stereo mix.
  • Used in the episodes "Card Carrying Red Shoes" and "Some Like It Lukewarm"
  • While Jeff Barry is officially credited as the writer of the song, several sites and sources claim Ellie Greenwich to have co-written the track. [1]

"Ríu, Ríu Chíu"

  • Traditional
  • Lead vocals by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, with Micky Dolenz, Michael Nesmith and Peter Tork
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded on 21 August, 1967
  • Released: January 1990
  • Original Album: Missing Links Volume Two
  • Recording Session: Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited
  • Duration: 0:01:34
  • Genre: Spanish Villancico
  • Label: Rhino Records
  • Mix/Version: Studio Version + 1989 Stereo Mix
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Definitive Monkees - Disc 2
  • The song was recorded during the sessions for "Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Ltd". It was a traditional Spanish Christmas carol chosen by Producer Douglas who had performed it with the Modern Folk Quartet. This version features Douglas filling in for Davy Jones on lead vocals, along with Dolenz, Nesmith and Tork. The Monkees also performed it on their Christmas 1967 TV episode.

I'll Be Back up on My Feet

  • Written by Sandy Linzer, and Denny Randell
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Al Casey, Michael Deasy, and Dennis Budimir
  • Harpsichord: Michael Melvoin
  • Bass Guitar: Max Bennett
  • Drums: Earl Palmer
  • Percussion: Brendan Cahill
  • Tambourine: Milt Holland, and Stan Levey
  • Quica: Milt Holland, and Stan Levey
  • Saxophone: William Hood
  • Trumpet: Buddy Childers, and Oliver Mitchell
  • Trombone: Louis Blackburn, and Lew McCreary
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 9 March and 14 March 1968
  • Released: 22nd April 1968
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:02:27
  • Genre: Jazz Music, Soul Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Intended for More of The Monkees, then again for Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited.
  • The original version of this song was used in the episodes "Dance, Monkee, Dance" and "Monkees in the Ring". It was eventually released on Missing Links Volume Two
  • The copy of the song used was ripped from the "Original Album Series" from the album "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees". While the sound quality is remarkable, the copy of this song contains a dropout - one second into the song - that had not been corrected before the "Original Album Series" was issued. Thankfully the drop out was so minor, it can't easily be noticed without close observation.
  • The reason the song appears as the 12th track, is due to a mistake I made when finding out when each of the selected tracks for my compilation were recorded. I accidentally placed the song where the version recorded for Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited would chronologically have been featured. However the mistake was fortunate because I think the song suits it's current spot on the compilation, rather than being placed after "Rosemarie" which was started, but not completed before the album version of "I'll Be Back up on My Feet" was recorded.
  • Like all songs released on The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees (excluding "Daydream Believer"), The Monkees are credited as the producers of "I'll Be Back up on My Feet". However the individual Monkees recorded mostly as solo artists during the sessions for their fifth album, so thus it is unclear who the producers of the track in reality are.

We Were Made for Each Other

  • Written by Carole Bayer Sager, and George Fischoff
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Guitar: James Burton, Michael Deasy, Al Hendrickson, Gerry McGee
  • Harpsichord: Michael Melvoin
  • Bass Guitar: Max Bennett
  • Drums: Earl Palmer
  • Percussion: Brendan Cahill, Milt Holland, Jerry Williams
  • Mallet: Milt Holland
  • Violin: Sam Freed, Nathan Kaproff, George Kast, Marvin Limonick, Alexander Murray, Erno Neufeld
  • Cello: Maria Fera, Jacquelyn Lustgarten, Kurt Reher, Eleanor Slatkin
  • Trumpet: Buddy Childers, Jack Sheldon
  • Trombone: Lewis McCreary
  • French Horn: Vincent DeRosa, David Duke, Richard Preissi
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at Western Recorders Studio 2, 6 February and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 7 and 9 February 1968
  • Released: 22nd April 1968
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:02:25
  • Genre: Broadway Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Intended for Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn & Jones Limited
  • The reason the song appears as the 13th track, is due to a mistake I made when finding out when each of the selected tracks for my compilation were recorded. I accidentally placed the song where the version recorded for Pisces, Aquarius, Capricorn and Jones Limited would chronologically have been featured. However the mistake was fortunate because I think the song suits it's current spot on the compilation, rather than being placed before or after "Dream World" which had been started on the same day.
  • Like all songs released on The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees (excluding "Daydream Believer"), The Monkees are credited as the producers of "We Were Made for Each Other". However the individual Monkees recorded mostly as solo artists during the sessions for their fifth album, so thus it is unclear who the producers of the track in reality are. I believe that Carole Bayer who co-wrote the song participated in producing it, though this is probably just speculation.

"Merry Go Round"

  • Written by Diane Hilderbrand and Peter Tork
  • Lead vocal by Peter Tork
  • Bass Guitar: Peter Tork
  • Organ: Peter Tork
  • Piano: Peter Tork
  • Unknown: Lance Wakely
  • Produced by Peter Tork
  • Recorded at Western Recorders, 20 January, and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 22 and 31 January, 1968
  • Released: March 1996
  • Original Album: Missing Links Volume Three
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:01:44
  • Genre: Psychedelic Pop
  • Label: Rhino Records
  • Mix/Version: 1968 Mono Mix
  • Channels: Mono
  • Ripped from: The Definitive Monkees - Disc 2
  • The reason the song appears as the 14th track, is due to a mistake I made when finding out when each of the selected tracks for my compilation were recorded. I accidentally placed the version of Merry Go Round from Missing Links Volume Three where the demo version would chronologically have been featured. However the mistake was fortunate because I think the song suits it's current spot on the compilation, rather than being placed after "Auntie's Municipal Court" which had been started beforehand.
  • Like most songs recorded during the sessions for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees, the Monkees are credited as the producers of "Merry Go Round". However it is hinted on a few sites that Peter Tork was the one who actually produced the song.
  • First song on the compilation to feature Peter Tork on lead vocals (not counting "Shades of Gray" which also features David Jones on lead vocals, "Peter Percival Patterson's Pet Pig Porky" which isn't really a song, and "Words" which also features Micky Dolenz on lead vocals). And apparently the last song on the compilation to feature Peter Tork on lead vocals.

P.O. Box 9847

  • Written by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocal: Unknown
  • Electric Guitar: Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Joe Osborn
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Percussion: Billy Lewis
  • Tack Piano: Bobby Hart
  • Violin: Victor Arno, Jack Pepper
  • Viola: Philip Goldberg
  • Cello: Raymond Kelley
  • Marxophone: Unknown
  • Tabla: Unknown
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Arrangement: Don McGinnis
  • Recorded at United Recorders, Hollywood, 26 December, 1967 and 10 February, 1968
  • Released: 22nd April 1968
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:03:15
  • Genre: Psychedelic Pop
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: Monkeemania (The Very Best of the Monkees) - Disc 2
  • Inspired by an idea by Bob Rafelson
  • The song was produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart, but like all songs recorded for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees, the producer's credit was given to The Monkees.
  • The copy I was originally going to use was from the "Original Album Series" from the album "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees". Although the sound quality was remarkable, I was a touch disappointed by the fact that the copy contained at least 22 dropouts that had not been corrected before the "Original Album Series" was issued. Thankfully I discovered a copy of the song from "Monkeemania (The Very Best of the Monkees" with equally remarkable sound quality and without all those drop outs. I was a little worried that the copy had a sharper fade than the copy from the "Original Album Series" partly due to it been a second shorter. But it turns out the copy was only a second shorter because it fell one second short of blank space separating it from the next song.

Valleri

  • Written by Tommy Boyce, and Bobby Hart
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocal: Unknown
  • Electric Guitar: Gerry McGee, and Louie Shelton
  • Bass Guitar: Joe Osborne
  • Drums: Billy Lewis
  • Tambourine: Billy Lewis
  • Saxophone: Jim Horn, Jay Migliori
  • Trumpet: Oliver Mitchell, and Roy Caton
  • Trombone: Lew McCreary
  • Produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart
  • Arrangement: Don McGinnis
  • Recorded at United Recorders, Hollywood, 26 and 28 December, 1967
  • Released: 2nd March and 22nd April 1968
  • Original Single: Valleri (A-Side)
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:02:20
  • Genre: Doo-Wop, Rock Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master (without Fade)
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: 25th Anniversary Collection
  • The song was produced by Tommy Boyce and Bobby Hart, but like all songs recorded for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees, the producer's credit was given to The Monkees.
  • Reached #3 on the pop charts
  • Second time the band recorded it, with the same personnel; the remake was so the Monkees could take production credit.
  • Colgems chief Lester Sill rejected the first mix, saying it needed "more punch", and had a brass section overdubbed.
  • This mix was used for the episode "Monkee's Blow Their Minds" with the fade-out dropped (a factor which would later be used on compilations, including my own).
  • The original version of the song was used in the episodes "Captain Crocodile" and "Monkees in Manhattan". It was also eventually released on Missing Links Volume Two.
  • The copy presented here was taken from the album 25th Anniversary Collection. Despite the copy being a 1992 re-master, I chose it over the copy from The Definitive Monkees which was a 2001 re-master - I feared the copy had a sharper fade out which was eventually revealed to only appear sharper because the copy was at a higher volume. I flatly refused to use the copy from the Original Album Series - The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees disc because it contained a massive number of dropouts - at least 83. Also it has a fade-out, and it was the mix without the fade that I grew up with.

Auntie's Municipal Court

  • Written by Keith Allison, and Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: Michael Nesmith
  • Backing vocals: Michael Nesmith, Bill Chadwick, and Unknown
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith, Keith Allison, and Bill Chadwick
  • Bass Guitar: Richard Dey
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Percussion: Michael Nesmith
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 6, 15 and 16 January, 1968
  • Released: 22nd April 1968
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:04:05
  • Genre: Country and Western, Psychedelic Pop
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • The mono mix puts more emphasis on the guitar accompaniment.
  • Only song on "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees" (besides Daydream Believer) to feature more than one member of the band.
  • An alternate mix featuring Michael on lead vocals was included as a bonus track on the 2010 reissue of "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees", although the lyric - (Fine man, crazy man, he can't see. Sound of the sunset, sound of the sea. Why do the people walk away from me? Nobody can see that) - during the final verse still features Micky on lead. It appears that Michael's lead vocal on this mix is the same as Michael's backing vocal on the original album mix.
  • Michael was probably originally going to sing lead in this song, but he later called Micky in to add his vocals to the track. The Nesmith vocals were seemingly reduced to harmony and backing vocals.
  • The alternate mix with Michael on lead vocals features additional sound effects during the final instrumental section. There is another alternate mix - with Micky on lead - that features the additional sound effects. This mix was included on the "Listen to the Band" and the "Music Box" sets.
  • Like all songs released on "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees" (excluding "Daydream Believer"), The Monkees are credited as the producers of "Auntie's Municipal Court". However I believe that Michael Nesmith was the producer of the track because he was the one in charge of the song's recording sessions. But this is probably just speculation.

Dream World

  • Written by David Jones, and Steve Pitts
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Guitar: Michael Deasy, Al Hendrickson, and Gerry McGee
  • Harpsichord: Don Randi
  • Bass Guitar: Max Bennett
  • Drums: Earl Palmer
  • Percussion: Brendan Cahill, Teresa Helfer, Milt Holland, and Jerry Williams
  • Violin: Sam Freed, Nathan Kaproff, George Kast, Martin Limonick, Alexander Murray, and Erno Neufeld
  • Cello: Marie Feram, Edgar Lustgarten, Jacquelyn Lustgarten, and Fredrick Seykora
  • Trumpet: Buddy Childers, and Jack Sheldon
  • Trombone: George Roberts
  • French Horn: John Cave, Don Duke, and Arthur Maebe
  • Produced by David Jones
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at Western Recorders Studio 2, 6 February, and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 8 February 1968
  • Released: 22nd April 1968
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:03:22
  • Genre: Broadway Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Like all songs released on "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees" (excluding "Daydream Believer"), The Monkees are credited as the producers of "Dream World". However I believe that David Jones was the producer of the track because he was the only Monkee to actively participate in the track's creation. He co-wrote the song, and it was written and recorded in his style. But this is probably just speculation.

The Poster

  • Written by David Jones, and Steve Pitts
  • Lead vocal by David Jones
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Al Casey, Michael Deasy, and Howard Roberts
  • Bass Guitar: Max Bennett, and Lyle Ritz
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Percussion: Gary Coleman, and Gene Estes
  • Tambourine: Gary Coleman, and Gene Estes
  • Organ: Don Randi
  • Glockenspiel: Gary Coleman, and Gene Estes
  • Violin: Nathan Kaproff, George Kast, Marvin Limonick, Alex Murray, Erno Neufeld, and Ambrose Russo
  • Saxophone: John Lowe
  • Woodwind: John Lowe
  • Trumpet: Buddy Childers, Clyde Reasinger, Jack Sheldon, and Anthony Terran
  • Trombone: Milt Bernhart, Richard Leith, Lew McCreary, and Frank Rosolino
  • Produced by David Jones
  • Arrangement: Shorty Rogers
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 15 and 17 February 1968
  • Released: 22nd April 1968
  • Original Album: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:02:22
  • Genre: Broadway Music
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Monkees: Original Album Series - The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Like all songs released on The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees (excluding "Daydream Believer"), The Monkees are credited as the producers of "The Poster". However I believe that David Jones was the producer of the track because he was the only Monkee to actively participate in the track's creation. He co-wrote the song, and it was written and recorded in his style. But this is probably just speculation.
  • The copy of the song used was ripped from the "Original Album Series" from the album "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees". While the sound quality is remarkable, the copy of this song contains a dropout - during the lyric "circus" in the first verse - that had not been corrected before the "Original Album Series" was issued. Thankfully the drop out was so minor, it can't easily be noticed without close observation.

"Shake 'Em Up" (and Let 'Em Roll)

  • Written by Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz and Unknown
  • Electric Guitar: Keith Allison
  • Acoustic Guitar: Bill Chadwick
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Eddie Hoh
  • Clarinet: Henry Diltz
  • Produced by Micky Dolenz
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 24 February, 1968
  • Released: March 1996
  • Original Album: Missing Links Volume Three
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:02:11
  • Genre: Jazz Music, Rock and Roll, Soul Music
  • Label: Rhino Records
  • Mix/Version: 1996 Stereo Mix
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Definitive Monkees - Disc 2
  • Like most songs recorded during the sessions for The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees, the Monkees are credited as the producers of "Shake 'Em Up". However I believe that Micky Dolenz was the producer of the track because he was the only Monkee to actively participate in the track's creation. He chose to record the song, and it was recorded in his style. But this is probably just speculation.
  • Micky's "Mister Henry Diltz on Clarinet" lyric is a reference that Henry Diltz plays clarinet in the song.
  • "Shake 'Em Up" was considered for, but rejected from "Changes".

Porpoise Song (Theme from Head)

  • Written by Gerry Goffin and Carole King
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: David Jones, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Ken Bloom, and Danny "Kootch" Kortchmar
  • Bass Guitar: Doug Lubahn
  • Drums: Michael Ney, and John Raines
  • Percussion: Michael Ney, and John Raines
  • Cymbals: Russ Titleman
  • Keyboard: Leon Russell, and Ralph Schuckett
  • Cello: Gregory Bemko, David Filerman, Jan Kelley, Jacqueline Lustgarten
  • Double Bass: Max Bennett, Clyde "Whitey" Hoggan, Jim Hughart, and Jerry Scheff
  • Brass: Bill Hinshaw, and Jules Jacob
  • Woodwind: Bill Hinshaw, and Jules Jacob
  • Produced by Gerry Goffin
  • Recorded at California Recorders, Hollywood, 26 and 28 February, 1968
  • Released: 23rd September and 1st December 1968
  • Original Single: Porpoise Song (A-Side)
  • Original Album: Head
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:04:13
  • Genre: Experimental Music, Psychedelic Pop
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1968 Stereo Single Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: Monkeemania (The Very Best of the Monkees) - Disc 2
  • Reached #62 on the Billboard Hot 100
  • The copy I was originally going to use was from the "25th Anniversary Collection", but because it was a 1992 re-master, I dropped it upon discovering a copy of the song from "Monkeemania (The Very Best of the Monkees)". Before I decided to use the 2011 re-master from Monkeemania, I made sure that it was identical to the copy from the 25th Anniversary Collection, not counting the higher quality. I refused to use the copy from "The Definitive Monkees" because it faded out a few seconds before the copies from the 25th Anniversary Collection, and Monkeemania, and the fade out was sharper. This is an obscure difference, but I do tend to get fussy in terms of choosing which copy of which song is better.
  • Last song on the compilation to feature the participation of David Jones.

"Rosemarie"

  • Written by Micky Dolenz
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Keith Allison
  • Acoustic Guitar: Micky Dolenz and Peter Tork
  • Bass Guitar: Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Drums: Jim Gordon
  • Tambourine: Larry Bunker
  • Piano: Michel Rubini
  • Saxophone: Bill Hood
  • Trumpet: Buddy Childers, Carroll Lewis, Oliver Mitchell, and Stu Williamson
  • Trombone: Lou Blackburn, Herbie Harper, and Lew McCreary
  • Produced by Micky Dolenz
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 1 and 14 March, and 7 June 1968
  • Released: July 1987
  • Original Album: Missing Links
  • Recording Session: The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees/Head
  • Duration: 0:02:30
  • Genre: Jazz Music, Soul Music
  • Label: Rhino Records
  • Mix/Version: 1987 Stereo Mix
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: The Definitive Monkees - Disc 2
  • Like most songs recorded during the sessions for "The Birds, the Bees and the Monkees", the Monkees are credited as the producers of "Rosemarie". However I believe that Micky Dolenz was the producer of the track because he was the only Monkee to actively participate in the track's creation. He wrote the song, and it was written and recorded in his style. But this is probably just speculation.
  • "Rosemarie" was considered for, but rejected from "Changes".

Listen to the Band

  • Written by Michael Nesmith
  • Lead vocal by Michael Nesmith
  • Electric Guitar: Michael Nesmith
  • Guitar: Wayne Moss, and Mike Saluzzi
  • Steel Guitar: Lloyd Green
  • Bass Guitar: Norbert Putnam
  • Drums: Jerry Carrigan
  • Percussion: Unknown
  • Piano: David Briggs
  • Keyboard: Michel Rubini
  • Harmonica: Charlie McCoy
  • Brass: Don McGinnis
  • Trumpet: Bud Brisbois, Buddy Childers, and Ray Triscari
  • Trombone: Dick Nash
  • Tuba: John Kitzmiller
  • Produced by Michael Nesmith
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Nashville, 1 June, and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 9 December, 1968
  • Released: 26th April and 1st October 1969
  • Original Single: Listen to the Band/Someday Man (A-Side - previously the B-Side)
  • Original Album: The Monkees Present
  • Recording Session: Head/Instant Replay
  • Duration: 0:02:46
  • Genre: Country Rock
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1969 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: 25th Anniversary Collection
  • Though not a huge hit at the time, the song has become a sort of theme for the group. Though Nesmith claims the lyrics weren't a plea to be judged on musical merit, people nonetheless chose to view them that way. Rhino records even chose the song's title as the name of the group's box set, released in April 1991. Michael would later re-record it with his own group The First National Band. Ironically, "Listen to the Band" was originally performed with Peter Tork on their NBC TV Special "33 1/3 Revolutions Per Monkee" early that same year. That version differs greatly from the single or album release. The album mix of the song has a slightly longer organ bridge section than the single mix does.
  • "Listen to the Band" was originally the B-Side, and "Someday Man" the A-Side. However because the former charted - at #63 - higher than the latter - #81 - and gained enthusiastic response, Listen to the Band was re-released as the A-Side.
  • Undoubtedly my favourite of the Michael Nesmith/Monkees country rock songs that were recorded at Nashville in May-June 1968 - I must admit I was a touch disappointed with the majority of the Nesmith country songs recorded at that time, because most of them didn't really sound like "The Monkees". This is understandable, since Michael Nesmith was the only Monkee that actively participated in the recording of these Nashville country songs. But his voice is very different from the two "iconic" voices of the Monkees.
  • The copy presented here was taken from the album "25th Anniversary Collection". Despite the copy being a 1992 re-master, I chose it over the copies from "The Definitive Monkees" and "Monkeemania (The Very Best of the Monkees)" even though they were re-mastered in 2001 and 2011 respectively. The album mix of "Listen to the Band" was the one I grew up with, and it had a longer organ bridge section than the single mix does. Sadly the single mix is much more common today than the album mix, the latter of which I only have on the 25th Anniversary Collection.
  • Last song on the compilation to feature the participation of Michael Nesmith.

"Steam Engine"

  • Written by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid, Clydie King, Jerry Yester, and Unknown
  • Guitar: Clarence White
  • Steel Guitar: Orville "Red" Rhodes
  • Bass Guitar:: Lyle Ritz
  • Drums: Jim Gordon
  • Tambourine: Eddie Hoh
  • Organ: Bill Martin
  • Reed: Bill Green and Bob Hardaway
  • Trumpet: Bill Peterson, Sanford Skinner, and Tony Terran
  • Trombone: Bobby Knight and Lew McCreary
  • Produced by Douglas Farthing-Hatlelid
  • Recorded at Western Recorders, 12 May, and RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, 8 July, 1969
  • Released: 1979, March 1996
  • Original Album: Monkeemania (40 Timeless Hits), Missing Links Volume Three
  • Recording Session: The Monkees Present
  • Duration: 0:02:25
  • Genre: Jazz Music, Rock Music
  • Label: Arista Records
  • Mix/Version: 1969 Mono + Television Soundtrack Mix
  • Channels: Mono
  • Ripped from: The Definitive Monkees - Disc 2
  • The song was originally considered for, but rejected from "Changes". It has since been released on several compilation albums by The Monkees, including "Monkee Business" in 1982, "Listen to the Band" in 1991, and the "Music Box" in 2001.

"Midnight Train"

  • Written by Micky Dolenz
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Backing vocals: Micky Dolenz, and Coco Dolenz
  • Electric Guitar: Louie Shelton
  • Banjo: James Burton
  • Bass Guitar: Joe Osborn
  • Drums: Hal Blaine
  • Harmonica: Tommy Morgan
  • Produced by Micky Dolenz
  • Recorded at RCA Victor Studios, Hollywood, CA, 16 July, 1969
  • Released: June 1970
  • Original Album: Changes
  • Recording Session: The Monkees Present
  • Duration: 0:02:08
  • Genre: Country Rock
  • Label: Colgems Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1970 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Ripped from: Changes
  • While Micky Dolenz is officially credited as the writer of the song, several sites and sources claim Chris McCarty, Kenny Lee Lewis and Steve Miller to have co-written the track. [2]
  • The song was originally demoed acoustically during the sessions for Headquarters sessions, but no finished takes had been captured. The demo version of the song was eventually released on "Missing Links Volume Three".
  • It states in an album review that "Midnight Train" is the only track from "Changes" in which the Monkees do not only provide vocals. However Micky Dolenz did not actually play an instrument in the album version of the song, unlike the demo version. It is presumed that the review meant that Midnight Train was the only track to feature a Monkee contributing more than just vocals, hence composing the track.
  • Surprisingly the album version of the song presented here, is 21 seconds shorter than the demo version, due to the faster tempo.
  • I was originally going to use the demo version of the song for the compilation, but I ultimately decided to buy the album "Changes" so that I could use the album version instead. I did this to make the compilation seem more like a greatest hits/favourites compilation than an average ordinary compilation. I know it may seem daft buying an album to collect one song. Although Changes was not The Monkees' greatest album, getting it did pay off.

"That Was Then, This is Now"

  • Written by Vance Brescia
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Harmony vocal: Peter Tork
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Michael Lloyd
  • Recorded at Heaven Studios, Beverly Hills, 30 May 1986
  • Released: 27th June, and July 1986
  • Original Single: That Was Then, This is Now (A-Side)
  • Original Album: Then and Now, The Best of the Monkees
  • Duration: 0:04:02
  • Genre: Synthpop Music
  • Label: Arista Records
  • Mix/Version: Single Version + 1986 Stereo Album Master
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Downloaded from: Then and Now, The Best of the Monkees
  • Reached #20 in the United States
  • I was originally going to use the mix of the song from "The Definitive Monkees" but upon discovering that the original mix was longer than the one from The Definitive Monkees, I decided to get it from a legal online distribution site - it was very hard finding albums that had the songs I wanted in the music store, before the unfortunate passing of Davy Jones, at least. A year after compiling and burning my compilation to CD, I bought the Monkees "Music Box" for a ridiculously cheap bargain of $20,0¢, that included the single and album mixes of "That Was Then, This is Now" and "Heart and Soul" respectively on the fourth disc.

"Heart and Soul"

  • Written by Simon Byrne and Andrew Howell
  • Lead vocal by Micky Dolenz
  • Other personnel unknown
  • Produced by Roger Bechirian
  • Recorded at Cherokee Studios, Hollywood, May-July 1987
  • Released: August 1987
  • Original Single: Heart and Soul (A-Side)
  • Original Album: Pool It!
  • Duration: 0:03:44
  • Genre: Pop Rock
  • Label: Rhino Records
  • Mix/Version: Album Version + 1995 Stereo Compilation Edit
  • Channels: Stereo
  • Downloaded from: Greatest Hits (1995)
  • Reached #87 on Billboard's Hot 100 chart
  • I was originally going to use the mix of the song from "The Definitive Monkees" but upon discovering that the 1995 mix of the song from "Greatest Hits" was longer than the one from The Definitive Monkees, I decided to get it from a legal online distribution site - it was very hard finding albums that had the songs I wanted in the music store, before the unfortunate passing of Davy Jones, at least. I would have purchased the album "Pool It!" but they didn't sell it in any of the local stores. A year after compiling and burning my compilation to CD, I bought the Monkees "Music Box" for a ridiculously cheap bargain of $20,0¢, that included the single and album mixes of "That Was Then, This is Now" and "Heart and Soul" respectively on the fourth disc. I discovered that the original album mix was a different copy again, being 12 seconds longer than the copy from Greatest Hits. Well, at least I didn't have to use the even shorter 2001 copy from The Definitive Monkees.

References

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